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10.2

Major VersionM

by Pete Prodoehl

Introduction

The micro:bit V2 has capacitive touch and a built-in speaker, but the default speaker pin conflicts with a touch pin, so we can use an external speaker instead.

Video Overview

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  1. Gather your components. You will need a micro:bit V2, a Bit Board, a Piezo Speaker, and some 1/8" Maker Tape. You do need a micro:bit V2 as it supports capacitive touch. Previous versions of the micro:bit will not work for this project without some modifications.   (You might be interested in our guide to capacitive touch on the micro:bit V1 board.)
    • Gather your components. You will need a micro:bit V2, a Bit Board, a Piezo Speaker, and some 1/8" Maker Tape.

    • You do need a micro:bit V2 as it supports capacitive touch. Previous versions of the micro:bit will not work for this project without some modifications. (You might be interested in our guide to capacitive touch on the micro:bit V1 board.)

    • Assemble on a LEGO baseplate and use Maker Tape to connect the Piezo Speaker. Then add tape connecting to Pins 0, 1, and 2.

  2. Connect a USB cable to the micro:bit and then plug it into your computer.
  3. Touching the tape connected to Pin 0, 1, or 2 will play a tone on the Piezo Speaker and also show a number on the micro:bit's built-in LED matrix. Touching the logo on the micro:bit will play a tone on the piezo speaker and also show a symbol on the micro:bit's built-in LED matrix.
    • Touching the tape connected to Pin 0, 1, or 2 will play a tone on the Piezo Speaker and also show a number on the micro:bit's built-in LED matrix.

    • Touching the logo on the micro:bit will play a tone on the piezo speaker and also show a symbol on the micro:bit's built-in LED matrix.

Finish Line

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Pete Prodoehl

Member since: 03/04/2020

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